ARCHITECTS and ENGINEERS

Meeting the Healthcare Needs of Rural Communities

07.05.16
Kevin Day, AIA

Gualala Community Clinic for Redwood Coast Medical Services in northern California.

CHALLENGES IN RURAL AREAS

As the national healthcare dialogue turns toward wellness, healthcare organizations are identifying new strategies to meet the needs of underserved markets. Rural areas, in particular, often lack basic resources taken for granted in urban areas.

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Topics: Healthcare

Changes in Clinical Practice

Electronic telecommunications technology is expanding exponentially, increasing opportunities for mobile healthcare delivery. Fitbits, smart watches and health apps deliver healthcare data to our touchscreen fingertips on the go. We can track our steps, check our heart rate, access lab results and consult with a physician without actually walking into a clinic.

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Topics: Healthcare

Planning Successful Operating Rooms from an Engineering Perspective

By Krista Biason, PE, and Jeff Harris, PE

An operating room at Owensboro Health Regional Hospital in Kentucky.

I'm too hot, it's too humid. I keep hitting my head on the med gas drops. Why is that outlet box hanging from the ceiling? There are not enough receptacles, they are in the wrong place. There are not enough outlets in the boom. Why are the med gas outlets over there, how come the anesthesia boom is at the patient's feet, where is my integration system, and why isn't there a camera in the surgical lights?

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Topics: Healthcare, Engineering

The Architect Broker Relationship

Architects often partner with brokers to brainstorm space-planning techniques and create sample renderings for the broker to provide to clients. This aids the broker by improving leasing, the tenant by providing a better visual of the office space, and the architect by garnering new business. In this Q&A with GlobeSt, HGA Principal Win Roney discusses the relationship between brokers and architects when leasing office space.

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Topics: Corporate

Resilient Design: Planning for Risk

Once building owners have categorized and prioritized risk through forecasting and assessing, they can then plan and implement resilient strategies that will enable them to function during an extreme event and quickly resume normal operations afterward. Planning does not eliminate risk, but rather anticipates risks through adaptation and mitigation.

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Topics: Sustainability & Resiliency

Buzzworthy Technologies

We're on the cusp of a technology renaissance to rival the early days of the personal computing revolution, with new concepts and tools emerging daily, if not hourly. The following buzzworthy technologies – such as the Internet of Things, virtual reality, and artificial intelligence – show a great deal of promise. Click the guided tour below to get our take on how each of these concepts impacts our digital and physical environments.

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Topics: Technology

Integrating Keystone Experiences into Holistic Interiors

Keystone Experience illustration of Owensboro Health Regional Hospital entry.

OVERVIEW

Healthcare facility planning often focuses on programming, operations and patient safety as planners benchmark metrics to improve workflows and clinical outcomes. Yet a growing emphasis on wellness and the patient experience is adding new dimensions to the planning process as research links design to emotional well-being and clinical outcomes. By planning around Keystone Experiences, healthcare facility owners can gain deeper insight into patients' emotional needs to design holistic interiors that support workflow efficiency, clinical outcomes, and human well-being.

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Topics: Healthcare

Resilient Design: Assessing Risk

After forecasting risk based on four factors (natural disaster, climate, security, and infrastructure), the next step in resilient design is to assess the likelihood, severity and impact of those risks. What is the likelihood of a risk becoming a reality, and what would the severity be of that risk? A ½-inch per hour rain event will be far less severe than a 3½-inch per hour rain event. What are the potential impacts, both short-term and long-term? How would those impacts affect operations, health and safety of occupants or building security? What might the cost implications be?

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Topics: Sustainability & Resiliency

Using the Internet of Things to Manage Efficient Buildings, Part III

In order for Internet of Things (IoT) projects to be successfully deployed for a commercial building, there must be a business case that needs to be solved. The ROI may be a financial payback or improved customer satisfaction, but without a clear understanding of the problems to be solved it is difficult to select the right IoT strategy. Customers may want to improve energy or operational efficiency. Energy codes, such as ASHRE Title 24, may mandate reductions in energy usage that will necessitate more intelligent building systems. Retailers, advertisers and many others have an interest in using new IoT data channels for optimizing planning and strategy.

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Topics: Technology

Using the Internet of Things to Manage Efficient Buildings, Part II


In my previous post, we learned that Internet of Things (IoT) devices are intelligent sensors and actuators that can connect to the Internet and interact with other intelligent, connected devices. All of these devices will generate a large amount of raw data that must be processed in order to be turned into actionable insight. That means there must be software behind the connected devices in order to make them useful.

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Topics: Technology

Ideas

HGA’s team of architecture, engineering, planning and design experts share their knowledge through research, published articles, white papers, and speaking engagements.